The History of the Greater Delaware Procrastination Society

Three strangers walked into Frank’s Diner located on the main drag of Shawnee Ferry, Delaware, for a late lunch in the evening of March 3, 1951. They each took a seat at the counter, glanced and nodded to acknowledge each other’s presence.

“What can I get you fellas?” Marge asked while chewing on the end of the pencil she had just removed from somewhere in her beehive hairdo.

“I would like the lunch special,” the three men said simultaneously.

Marge chuckled, turned her head and hollered to Art the cook, “Have we got any meatloaf left from lunch?”

Art appeared in the opening to the kitchen, put his gnarled hands on the stainless steel counter, stared at the ham sandwich he had made an hour earlier, shook his head and said, “I’ve been meaning to make some meatloaf, but I ain’t gotten ’round to it yet. We got some pot roast.”

Marge turned back to the men. “Sorry, how about the pot roast?”

Never men to make hasty decisions, the three strangers ordered black coffee.

Marge poured the last of the coffee into three cups, set them before the men, then tapped her fingernails on the counter. “Need some time?”

The men nodded slowly, waited until the coffee was cold and then took a sip.

This was how Tom Behren, Dennis Hernandez and Bob Colwell met. A month later, they realized the importance of the first, of what became a weekly, meeting. The shared traits of being late to work each day, paying bills two weeks after the due date, trying to use expired coupons at the Piggly Wiggly and racking up substantial fines at the library, drew the men together each Tuesday evening for their Monday morning meeting. Well, occasionally drew them together.

Two years later, after meeting for the third time, the men marched into the library, returned their overdue books, surprising the lady behind the counter of what was now the Shawnee Ferry Veteran’s Home, left and walked down the street to keep their appointment of the previous November at the law office of Hafey, Walton and Markley. They talked to the receptionist, paid the five dollar fee and voila… the Greater Delaware Procrastination Society became a legal corporation. To celebrate the men walked across the street to Frank’s Diner and took their usual seats at the counter.

“What can I get you fellas?” Marge asked while chewing on the end of the pencil she had just removed from somewhere in her beehive hairdo.

“We would like the lunch special,” the three men said simultaneously.

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